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cokosfunhouse:

i’ll only make a couple of characters and they’ll all have something important to do with each others plot!

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(via detectivetoony)

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why-i-love-comics:

World’s Finest #19 - “The League for Larceny!” (1945)

written by Joe Samachsonart by Bob Kane & Jack Burnley

why-i-love-comics:

World’s Finest #19 - “The League for Larceny!” (1945)

written by Joe Samachson
art by Bob Kane & Jack Burnley

(via fyeahdickgrayson)

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This guy has some of the best investment ideas I’ve ever heard in my life.

(Source: dailypawnee, via kane52630)

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strongerbetterfasterthinner:

Nothing else needs to be said.

(Source: eeames, via thatwasnt-verychanel)

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camigirl4k3:

ruinedchildhood:


STRAIGHT GOT HIS ASS

Oh shit!

camigirl4k3:

ruinedchildhood:

STRAIGHT GOT HIS ASS

Oh shit!

(Source: tvgifable, via midtowncomics)

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flying-potato:

snarkydiscolizard:

"i’m sad and idk how to feel better"

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"i don’t know what to draw"

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"i always mess up"

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"BUT I SUCK"

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Whenever you feel sad about your art, listen to Bob Ross.

(via sunny-with-a-chance-of-sarcasm)

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lego-joker:

ruckawriter:

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]
By Chris Sims
To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.
Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.
READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

Even though I still think Rucka can’t write the Joker to save his life, this is a pretty damn good interview. Give it a read.

lego-joker:

ruckawriter:

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]

By Chris Sims

To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.

Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.

READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

Even though I still think Rucka can’t write the Joker to save his life, this is a pretty damn good interview. Give it a read.